Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

CFA Events Calendar

View full calendar

CFA Events Calendar

View full calendar

Recommended Discussions

See how our partners can help you ace your CFA exams.

Is Schweser enough to pass entire level?

I have a confession to make. Everyone says you should have a look at the CFA institute books, do the questions in it, etc. I'm not sure where these people come from, because I haven't got enough time to do all their questions as well as Schweser's!

Has anyone here completed a level without referring AT ALL to the CFA official curriculum? Just wondering if it is at all possible, or generally you have to hit those books too.

Comments

  • Hi @Tacheman, I felt the same too as the curriculum looked too much to handle for me at that time I took the CFA. So I relied entirely on prep notes like Schweser as I only had weekends (Elan didn't exist then, I wasn't aware of 7city that time) - and yes, I did the thing that you shouldn't do - I did not refer to the official curriculum at all :\">

    Survived - but I'm one lucky example...
    AjFinance
  • TacheMan said:

    I have a confession to make. Everyone says you should have a look at the CFA institute books, do the questions in it, etc. I'm not sure where these people come from, because I haven't got enough time to do all their questions as well as Schweser's!

    Has anyone here completed a level without referring AT ALL to the CFA official curriculum? Just wondering if it is at all possible, or generally you have to hit those books too.

    Hi I think the curriculum notes are no doubt the bible to understand Cfa topic concepts and its especially very helpful for the non finance guys. It makes you understand thins as if you are completely out of this world and you are explained each and everything in minutest details so it all depends on you. If you are ok with the concepts generally then I guess schwesers are definitely more than enough. I believe or live with the saying that, the more you know the more you get confused so always know things precisely. :d
    AjFinancelulu123rocktheworld
  • ZeeZee Charterholder London - UKPosts: 1,550 Sr Partner
    @tacheman, Schweser alone is ok. The most important thing is to devote the time to learn and revise.
  • Sophie said:

    Hi @Tacheman, I felt the same too as the curriculum looked too much to handle for me at that time I took the CFA. So I relied entirely on prep notes like Schweser as I only had weekends (Elan didn't exist then, I wasn't aware of 7city that time) - and yes, I did the thing that you shouldn't do - I did not refer to the official curriculum at all :\">

    Survived - but I'm one lucky example...

    I only cleared level 1 and I relied solely on Schweser. For level II because I have more time I do refer to the official material, but I have yet to read an entire chapter. The CFA books makes for good reference material :)
  • well @diya uses the curriculum as a punchbag I recall ;)
  • @Sophie yes! It is satisfying and far more useless than actually reading it ^.^
    Though when I did accidentally open it I found out that by volume Korea has the largest option market o.O
    Sophie
  • Diya said:

    @Sophie yes! It is satisfying and far more useless than actually reading it ^.^
    Though when I did accidentally open it I found out that by volume Korea has the largest option market o.O

    Seoul also has the highest PhDs per capita, if memory serves.
  • I passed Level 1 with just Schweser, and Level 2 mainly with Schweser and a few EOC's. if you want the best chance of getting through though I would definitely do the EOC's...at the end of the day they are written by the same people who write the exam!
  • I think Schweser should be sufficient (except for ethics maybe), you just have to make sure to do as many mock questions/mock exams as possible.
    AjFinanceZee
  • ZeeZee Charterholder London - UKPosts: 1,550 Sr Partner
    Sascha said:

    I think Schweser should be sufficient (except for ethics maybe), you just have to make sure to do as many mock questions/mock exams as possible.

    Practice is definitely a large factor.

  • Practice is the largest factor! ^:)^
  • Schweser should be sufficient, I never even touch the underlying readings (CFAI) in level 1 not even their questions at the end of the each chapter (though it's highly recommended that you do so!).

    In level 2, I do refer to CFAI from time to time as I find schweser tend to over summarise certain information (maybe they are not important but at least for me, I would always like to understand the logic behind it rather than memorising it).

    All in all, get through ur notes ASAP and hit the questions, i think I learned a lot more and re-enforced what I know during the question practising stage.
    Sophielulu123
  • Wow, @Marc. That was very well written. I am almost done with my L1 curriculum and will start practicing papers soon. But i will definitely consider these views when i do my L2. Too late for L1 right?
    MattyJ
  • MarcMarc TorontoPosts: 186 Portfolio Manager
    @sidmenon

    First, I should clarify that the second last sentence of point 4 should read "These are NOT important terms or topics on their own..."

    As to your specific situation, I certainly would not recommend stopping everything and starting from scratch by trying to read the entire curriculum in advance of the exam. And please don't feel as if by reading Schwesser, or whoever, you are missing out on vast chunks of the curriculum. My point is that reading the CFA books is the only way to learn the entire scope of material that is fair game to be tested on the exam.

    I absolutely recommend that you do all of the end of chapter questions and generally give a higher priority to any of the questions that are actually provided by CFAI. As someone who has done my share of practice question, I can tell you that there is a noticeable difference between questions produced by CFAI and those written by prep providers. As you do your practice questions, take note of any possible answers that seem unfamiliar - even if you get the question right - and take a quick look at where it shows up in the curriculum.

    Again, the idea isn't to become an expert in everything, but rather to be aware enough to eliminate a wrong answer (and, by the way, it might actually end up being the right answer).
    Sophie
Sign In or Register to comment.